*READ BOOK ⇵ I Have Lived in the Monster ↝ Ebook or Kindle ePUB free

An excellent read for anyone who wants to understand the psychology of the serial killer, includes interviews. Following his first book, Whoever Fights Monsters, Ressler s second book looks atkillers, in particular, serial killers.Serial killer These two words intrigue many people.Once called stranger murders because of the lack of connection between victim and killer, this type of crime has become the popular topic of books, movies, and conversation People fear the randomness and unpredictability of the serial killer A victim is just in the wrong place at the wrong time.But there is a victimolo Following his first book, Whoever Fights Monsters, Ressler s second book looks atkillers, in particular, serial killers.Serial killer These two words intrigue many people.Once called stranger murders because of the lack of connection between victim and killer, this type of crime has become the popular topic of books, movies, and conversation People fear the randomness and unpredictability of the serial killer A victim is just in the wrong place at the wrong time.But there is a victimology Not always, but many times, victims are prostitutes or drifters, people who won t be missed or are less likely to be the subject of an intense search Gacy and Dahmer lured victims to their homes young men were tortured and killed by these two, whom Ressler calls monsters Most of these guys are after a particular type of victim.Perhaps the scariest thing about serial killers successful ones, anyway is that they don t look like serial killers The leering, weird, wild eyed killer is likely to cause suspicion and likely will soon be caught Dahmer, Bundy, and others functioned normally and looked like one of us So while they behave like monsters, they certainly don t look like monsters.Ressler, now retired from the FBI s Behavioral Science Unit, coined the term serial killer His book doesn t just deal with serial killers, though He talks about several sarin gas attacks in Japan and a few cases in which ex military men claimed Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome caused them to kill The cases in particular the interviews with Gacy and Dahmer are interesting The delivery, though, isn t impressive.One of my frequent complaints about John Douglas books is the look how great I am voice Ressler does the same thing Maybe it s just a byproduct of being good at one s job But both men have coauthors and you d think somewhere along the line one of them would step back and say, Hey, I think this is a bit much Call me crazy.I also find it odd that these two very famous profilers have written books about their cases but they rarely mention each other Is it just me or do these guys not like each other Anyway, back to the book at hand The title seemed kind of strange to me but I figured after I read the book it would make sense I guess I can sort of understand it now, as in he had to get into the killer s minds, but it s still weird Read Ressler when you get tired of reading the same set of stories over and over in John Douglas books Maybe by the time we work our way through the lot of them, a writer like Stephen Michaud with Roy Hazelwood will have a new book out While there was some interesting information, I wasn t really sure where it was trying to go and it feltlike an excuse for the author to stroke his ego and lash out at critics or others who misunderstood or misrepresented him, which is okay, but I didn t find it fun to read A lot I was familiar with already Obviously the guy is well known and an expert in his field, and this may have been just a quicky shot at making some money, but it isn t the best book on the subject I have tried. Sexual Homicide is an incredible book, useful to everyone who has an interest in the psychology of crime I Have Lived in the Monster is Ressler picking fights with imaginary enemies and preening for the camera I didn t think anyone could actually have a bigger ego than Douglas, yet there he stands. Written by an ex FBI agent who is the world s most famous explorer of the serial murderer s mind Pretty interesting I especially liked the chapter about the Japanese foreign exchange student on his way to a Halloween party, who stopped at the wrong house and was shot to death I mean, I didn t LIKE it it is an excellent example of anecdotal evidence for gun control There are also some interesting cases where the author who was a detective supervisor in the army s criminal investigation div Written by an ex FBI agent who is the world s most famous explorer of the serial murderer s mind Pretty interesting I especially liked the chapter about the Japanese foreign exchange student on his way to a Halloween party, who stopped at the wrong house and was shot to death I mean, I didn t LIKE it it is an excellent example of anecdotal evidence for gun control There are also some interesting cases where the author who was a detective supervisor in the army s criminal investigation division was able to disprove post traumatic stress disorder syndrome, as an excuse for several Vietnam vets to get away with murder.I also learned that prostitutes are often the targets of serial killers because they are willing to go off alone with strangers and are often not missed This was an interesting read, albeit not as interesting as Ressler s first book, Whoever Fights Monsters.The focus this time ison international crimes than domestic ones, and the cases covered are from Ressler s post FBI consulting rather than his in bureau investigations While this does allow coverage of some lesser known media exploited crimes overall, I found these cases less satisfying both in a cultural and a psychological context than his bureau investigations have been perhaps This was an interesting read, albeit not as interesting as Ressler s first book, Whoever Fights Monsters.The focus this time ison international crimes than domestic ones, and the cases covered are from Ressler s post FBI consulting rather than his in bureau investigations While this does allow coverage of some lesser known media exploited crimes overall, I found these cases less satisfying both in a cultural and a psychological context than his bureau investigations have been perhaps because much of his consulting involvement is engaged as post facto analysis in the courtroom phase of the crime rather than being focused on the identification and apprehension phase of getting the psychos off the street There s also a significant chunk of interview transcription from Ressler s interviews while incarcerated with John Wayne Gacy and Jeffrey Dahmer that I found a bit dry in the read of it, but Ressler s commentary on what is being said and why it is being said is some of theinteresting insights offered All in all, for someone interested in Ressler s work after retiring from the BSU, this is worth reading even if it doesn t match theinteresting and less politically polarized Whoever Fights Monsters If the work doesn t interest you in and of itself, however, Ressler indulges in enough I did this and I did that and I didn t do that even though my rivals say I did it rhetoric this go round to be actively offputting, often making the book readlike a rebuttal to personal criticism levied by his peers than it does the kind of fascinating insight into the criminal mind Ressler can deliver when he chooses to worry less about what people think of him andabout the crimes he s discussing I have read almost of all of John Douglas books, so I figured I would like this one too, since Robert Ressler was in the same unit, at the same time, with Douglas Ressler s tales are interesting, but his constant whining and ego stroking, make this read incredibily frustrating I found myself wishing that he would stop talking about himself and explaint he processes in which he develops a profile and catches the criminal I don t think I ll be reading anybooks by him. *READ BOOK ⇞ I Have Lived in the Monster ☠ It seems that when normal life goes into eclipse, the differences in cultural patterns also fade away, and at the outer edges of behavior, deviant patterns are the same, the world over This absorbing second book from the serial killer expert who wrote Whoever Fights Monsters haschaptersan unusual Japanese case of a doctor killing his familyexamples of the use and abuse of post traumatic stress disorder diagnosis by Vietnam veteransthe murder of a Japanese exchange student by a Baton Rouge homeownerreview of patterns found in serial murders, including those in Japaninterview with John Wayne Gacy, seeking to understand his psychology two part psychological interview with Jeffrey Dahmer, revealing several fascinating new detailstwo British cases on which the author was asked to consultinvestigation of a South African serial killerthe Aum Shinri Kyo cult sarin nerve gas terrorists in Japan While the majority of the stories are interesting, I almost gave up on the book several times due to the tone of the author He seems to take great pride in sharing his numerous achievements and stressing how helpful he was in each case He also seems to take great pride in putting down others former colleagues, police he has worked with, etc His narration was very off putting, and I would rather hear someone else tell the stories. I had an obsession with this subject for a while so I read everything I could This is a must read for anyone interessted in serial killers Beyond the movie stereotype to real people It s hard to believe they exist in the same world as us as they are so out there they seem fictional, but they are very real and very complex.