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Benjamin Grob Fitzgibbon s Imperial Endgame is a study of Britain s final decades as an empire Unlike many studies that emphasize weaknesses within the British Government or highlight indigenous rejection of British overlordship, Grob Fizgibbon takes a controversial and thought provoking approach in his argument that decolonization was, in fact, a successful goal of Her Majesty s Government The events that took place in Palestine, Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus each presented unique challenges and Benjamin Grob Fitzgibbon s Imperial Endgame is a study of Britain s final decades as an empire Unlike many studies that emphasize weaknesses within the British Government or highlight indigenous rejection of British overlordship, Grob Fizgibbon takes a controversial and thought provoking approach in his argument that decolonization was, in fact, a successful goal of Her Majesty s Government The events that took place in Palestine, Malaya, Kenya, and Cyprus each presented unique challenges and responses from both Great Britain and indigenous resistance, all of which pushed toward an intentional and gradual decolonization, while maintaining positive international relations via the Commonwealth The story Grob Fitzgibbon unveils is an incredibly readable perspective of the upper echelons of the British Government and military from the mid 1940s through the early 1960s, one that challenges the historiography of previous studies Any comprehensive study of British decolonization would be greatly enriched by the detail in Endgame In his introduction, Grob Fitzgibbon explains his eye catching title with an explanation of the dirty wars fought through decolonization Like in all wars, most of the important decisions were made by officials safe behind their desks worlds away from the kill zones, innocent civilians of these areas were killed in mass numbers, and prisoners were horribly mistreated or even killed when their captors were forbidden to do so Since the emergence of the Cold War, the rules for war have changed considerably Britain, in the past, followed formal, civilized rules when engaged in war Like the conflicts between the U.S and North Korea or Vietnam, Britain s dirty little wars were a clash between the advanced West and a varied indigenous resistance with no rules or codes whatsoever Unlike the United States conflicts, the bloody battles of British decolonization were an imperial strategy that intended to secure the colonies within the Commonwealth through a transfer of power from Her Majesty s government to independent governments developed with liberal ideals Before decolonization, the empire s intended role was to educate the colonized parts of the world about Western values Britain served as a teacher of civil liberties and civic virtues, a guardian and guide to a better existence for those of inferior cultures with equally inferior values World War II changed the game for the Empire Attlee replaced Churchill, representing a major shift in British politics, and though Germany no longer was a threat to the world, the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union endangered the stability only just achieved The age of empires was rapidly ending, and many describe a series of fumbling mishaps when describing decolonization Each dirty war however was a unique learning experience complete with setbacks, at times major, the costs of which were very dear, but as a whole, this process was successful It is difficult to find a book on Britain s final decades as an empire without finding criticism that typically highlights these years as a fumbling series of stubborn decisions made with little or no regard to the soon to be decolonized areas they affected The pivotal difference in Grob Fitzgibbon s argument to previous studies is that these dirty wars were only as dirty as they had to be, remained strictly within the borders of the colonies, and intentionally relinquished power to newly established governments on Britain s terms These nations remain in the Commonwealth of Nations today This book does not attempt to discuss the aftermath of the imposition of liberal imperialism on these areas after they achieved their independence Instead, it focuses on the decolonization process itself which offers valuable insight into the purposeful dirty little wars that ended the British Empire I don t think it reveals anything much that cannot be gleaned from other books about the State of Emergency in Malaya, or Kenya, or Palestine, or Egypt, or Aden As for drawing the dots together, it fails in that task.Regardless, seeing some of the political machinations in the background is interesting, but it does not go far enough with connecting the links between old British Empire colonial interests and terrorism with modern neo liberal colonialism and terrorism This is where the book fail I don t think it reveals anything much that cannot be gleaned from other books about the State of Emergency in Malaya, or Kenya, or Palestine, or Egypt, or Aden As for drawing the dots together, it fails in that task.Regardless, seeing some of the political machinations in the background is interesting, but it does not go far enough with connecting the links between old British Empire colonial interests and terrorism with modern neo liberal colonialism and terrorism This is where the book fails badly it had potential to start making the links on page 43 where it says By May 1946, Bevin and the chiefs of staff had convinced the cabinet defence committee and, in turn, the cabinet as a whole that the Middle East was an essential region in the emerging Cold War with the Soviet Union Colonial affairs were thus inextricably linked with the larger national security of Britain but it does not really explore these links in any great detail, other than in Cyprus, and only tentatively The author could have gone a lot further with the invention of terrorism as something other for national security purposes, especially with regards to Kenya and the Mau Mau, but he doesn t make these links which could do a lot to explain the geopolitical roots of the current War on Terror.Maybe I was expecting far too much from this book (Download Kindle) ô Imperial Endgame: Britain's Dirty Wars and the End of Empire ï The story of the British Empire in the twentieth century is one of decline, disarray, and despondency Or so we have been told In this fresh and controversial account of Britain s end of empire, Benjamin Grob Fitzgibbon rejects this consensus, showing instead that in the years the British government developed a successful imperial strategy based on devolving power to indigenous peoples within the Commonwealth This strategy was calculated to allow decolonization to occur on British terms rather than those of the indigenous populations, and thus to keep these soon to be former colonies within the British and Western spheres of influence during the Cold War To achieve this new form of informal liberal imperialism, however, the government had to rely upon the use of illiberal dirty wars Spanning the globe from Palestine to Malaya, Kenya to Cyprus, these dirty wars represented Britain s true imperial endgame