`DOWNLOAD E-PUB ↬ La salute disuguale ↠ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Title The Health GapAuthor Michael G MarmotGenre Non FictionPublication Date September 10, 2015The book, The Health Gap takes place in today s society, and shares the stories of people in different countries and how different their social economic situations are It shows that a poor man from Glasgow is rich compared to the average Indian It also shows that the wealthier you are, thetreatment and care you get for your health It conveys the fact that it has been proven around the w Title The Health GapAuthor Michael G MarmotGenre Non FictionPublication Date September 10, 2015The book, The Health Gap takes place in today s society, and shares the stories of people in different countries and how different their social economic situations are It shows that a poor man from Glasgow is rich compared to the average Indian It also shows that the wealthier you are, thetreatment and care you get for your health It conveys the fact that it has been proven around the world that we know what we must do in order the make these health inequalities smaller, but yet we don t.This book really puts a new perspective on society It made me realize how unfair our society is and how the social pyramid of wealth has a big impact in our lives If you were to read this book, i suggest you go into it with an open mindset so you can open your eyes to a new way to look at the world around you Admittedly, I gave up on this one The author talked a lot, but it was mostly sharing his own experiences and very little actual suggestions on policy changes He urged people to make a difference, but didn t give any specific suggestions. The author does a good job of laying out the social determinants of health and making suggestions for how he believes health for entire populations can be improved The book is easy to read, and the author has a breezy, conversational style My average ranking may have come from my own expectations My big problem with the arguments the author makes in favor of improving overall health for all are that, if you already agree with the author, then you ll agree with his arguments For those who alr The author does a good job of laying out the social determinants of health and making suggestions for how he believes health for entire populations can be improved The book is easy to read, and the author has a breezy, conversational style My average ranking may have come from my own expectations My big problem with the arguments the author makes in favor of improving overall health for all are that, if you already agree with the author, then you ll agree with his arguments For those who already believe as both the author and I do that improving the health is a worthwhile goal, his arguments are preaching to the choir If you don t believe that, then I think his argument would fall on deaf ears I guess I was hoping forarguments that could possibly convince those on the other side of the argument A secondary problem for me is that I am already familiar with social determinants of health, and have been reading quite a bit for my MSW program I think that those who are less familiar with the concept would enjoy this book quite a bitthan I did 3.75Took a while to read this book for non book related reasons and also because its requires FULL attention and the writing doesn t quite flow and is a tad repetitive HOWEVER,V glad to have read it I have to admit, it wasn t what I expected it to be I expected an analysis focusingon diseases and health care and this book ISN T THAT Rather, it is an analysis of a series of reports commissioned on the social determinants of health inequity It looks in details at the global state of heal 3.75Took a while to read this book for non book related reasons and also because its requires FULL attention and the writing doesn t quite flow and is a tad repetitive HOWEVER,V glad to have read it I have to admit, it wasn t what I expected it to be I expected an analysis focusingon diseases and health care and this book ISN T THAT Rather, it is an analysis of a series of reports commissioned on the social determinants of health inequity It looks in details at the global state of health and what underlies health equity LEARNT SO MUCH LMTU Most important point Health inequality isn t just about the poorest people, it follows a clear social gradient There is not an us and them It covers Early child development children with both parents in work have the best health outcomes when controlled for other factors Education education of women globally may be one of the most impactful steps of all in tackling health inequity Work Lower status jobs Less perception of control poorer conditions Poorer health outcomes Contrary to the idea that people in high status jobs have poor health due to stress see The Whitehall Study I and II summary Social resilience protection against social inequality buffers health outcomes Structure of society Globalisation mainly aid in the context of debt, learnt about vulture funds like can we get it 2gether I liked that it broke down the data and real world findings related to health and tried not to politicise it because of course, thegovernments that adopt the recommendations, the better And it also made it easier to trust given the general lack of spin It also discussed health GLOBALLY not just in Europe or in the US or whatever The US it does poorly on almost all health metrics despite it s high and often highest per capita spending on health care compared to peer countries , but social inequality and health outcomes are very poor and haven t improved Relatively much poorer countries like Costa Rica, have at least equal or better health outcomes than the US The UK also scores poorly on metrics like child wellbeing only just higher than the US in 2013, only 52% of children in the UK were said to have good development at age 5 And of course, conditions at the start of life have a lag effect on adult health and ultimately life expectancy and perhapsimportantly disability free life expectancy It really seems that the reasons for those disparities might be priorities I.e prioritising economic growth over social protections and wealth redistribution at the expense of health for example, with austerity policies Health equity is definitely a good metric off which to base how well a country and its population are doing given that health is directly impacted by attention to hard to argue with factors important for human flourishing see the 7 bullet point list above If these are not addressed, the social gradient of health inequality is steeper Yeah would definitely recommend this book to interested p a r t i e s Also like hmu would deffo do a job in global health inequality epidemiology One of my friends who is getting a PhD in Global Health was reading this book and then handed it over to me to read And so I dove into it all 400 some pages The result I sort of wish the editor of this book had been a bitdemanding the information presented is fantastic, but could easily have been given in 200 pages, not 400 That said, it was an interesting read, and something I wouldn t usually have been exposed to The takeaway messages when we think about health, or health outcom One of my friends who is getting a PhD in Global Health was reading this book and then handed it over to me to read And so I dove into it all 400 some pages The result I sort of wish the editor of this book had been a bitdemanding the information presented is fantastic, but could easily have been given in 200 pages, not 400 That said, it was an interesting read, and something I wouldn t usually have been exposed to The takeaway messages when we think about health, or health outcomes, people right away want to think about medical health care, and whether it is good or not But the truth is that the factors influencing our health, on a global and national and local scale, have much less to do with health care than with societal factors Do you want to live a long, healthy life Then avoid poverty at all costs Get as much education as you can Make sure you live in a rich area of town Have access to green space Live in a place where you can use public transport and bike walk to most places, especially your school and place of employment Have strong social ties And most importantly, live a life in which you feel empowered.Empowerment It was a fascinating idea backed by a LOT of research That all the best health advice we love to give eat well, get rest, exercise, avoid smoking, don t drink too much will not be followed if people do not feel empowered in their life If they are struggling, they just will not care about other things related to health Telling them to eat well when they can t pay their bills, or to take time for wellness and rest when they are being beaten at home it isn t going to work So the argument is simple and yet hard to do change societal conditions in order for people to thrive, through better early childhood education and intervention programs, through universal health care, through mental health services, through apprenticeship programs to avoid unemployment, etc and health will improve But we readers might be sitting here thinking, yes, yes, I get it But that isn t about me But this part is health follows a gradient Yes, you are healthier than those poorer than you But that friend who earns a few thousandStatistically they are a few notcheslikely to outlive you Are you middle class They you fall somewhere in the middle of the spectrum of life expectancy and likelihood of living to old age without major disabilities So caring about instituting changes matters because it is literally killing you to not You live in lovely suburbia but have to drive everywhere Hello sicknesses brought on by this Petition and argue for sidewalks For transit For bike lanes And crazy as it might sound, but the gradient of health applies not on a global scale, but a local scale You might earn what is an absurd amount of money in the global context, but if compared to your immediate world, say, the city you live in, you earn relatively little, your health suffers If you feel disempowered compared to your immediate surrounding, you will make worse choices Which is to say you could be earning 60k a year, but if you live in California and feel that isn t enough to let you take a vacation or live comfortably, the feeling of being disadvantaged compared to others will lead to worse health outcomes for you We are weird creatures, we humans It really was interesting to read And sort of made me think my PhD in literature is at least good for one thing statistically keeping me alive longer than a BA or MA alone would have Even if apparently a PhD in a field that earned proper income would have been a better choice Oh well At least I will now ride my bike and hope that offsets relative lack of income First of all, this book could have been a heck of a lot shorter While Marmot does make some very worthwhile cases for a healthier society, he unfortunately lacks brevity while doing so Early on in the book, Marmot claims through quoting Dickens that we presently live in the best and worst times healthcare and medicine have never beenadvanced, yet at the same time, the social gradient with regards to public health has also never been as high He later explains how people are a product First of all, this book could have been a heck of a lot shorter While Marmot does make some very worthwhile cases for a healthier society, he unfortunately lacks brevity while doing so Early on in the book, Marmot claims through quoting Dickens that we presently live in the best and worst times healthcare and medicine have never beenadvanced, yet at the same time, the social gradient with regards to public health has also never been as high He later explains how people are a product of their circumstances.I ll start off with the positives What I liked The literary references Michael Marmot is clearly well read and starts all of his chapters with either a quote from a literary classic or a quote by a memorable historical figure.Some things I learned The United States is one of 3 countries in the WORLD not to have state guaranteed maternity leave, alongside Papua New Guinea and Suriname Economists think that health leads to socio economic position, whereas public health people think that socio economic position leads to health Japanese culture protects against heart disease better than American culture Life expectancy in Sierra Leone is of 46, contrasted to 84 in Japan highest and lowest in the world Considering what a rich country it is, the USA fares pretty poorly on health In 49 other countries, 16 year old boys have better prospects of living to 60 than the USA and there is also one maternal death per 1800 births compared with 1 in 17,000 in Italy This is surprising considering the USA spends the most on health per capita than any other country Women in higher socio economic positions are the greatest drinkers of alcohol, yetalcohol related harm is associated with the lower ends of the socio economic spectrum 1 6 of the US population lack health insurance The latency effect contrary to popular belief, that which does not kill us makes usvulnerable Working professional parents speak 20,000words to their children on average than families on welfare.And now onto the negatives In some places I feel as though Marmot was a bit contradictory he says that in rich countries, getting richer does little for health Yet he also says that within certain areas in London or Glasgow, for example, life expectancy can vary by up to 20 years depending on the area, with the richer areas having better life expectancies For example, males in Tottenham in London can expect to live 18 years shorter than Queen s Gate in Kensington on of the richest areas of London.The book is filled with mostly unsurprising statistics mental health leads to a lower life expectancy a poor education and unemployment low income and ill health are determinants of poor health, which ultimately leads to a lower life expectancy Scandanavian countries have it all figured out, etc Perhaps I m being a bit unfair after all, my background is in healthcare and so a lot of these appear strikingly obvious for me.Elsewhere in the book, I felt that Marmot showed a degree of disregard for cultural sensitivity and there were undertones of a Western imperialistic outlook There were one too many references to poor disadvantaged Bengali or other nationality girls who were waiting for a liberation, lest they be trapped into a forced marriage Not that these problems do not exist, but rather it was the tone of the author and his generaliastions that I found unnecessary.There are too many statistics and not enough specific instruction on what should be done to overcome all of these health inequalities Yes, we should invest in the education Yes, we should help to bridge the gap between the rich and the poor What else Mostly, I found this book to be a rather lengthy summarisation of Marmot s political and economic views although he defends this point by saying that healthcare should be a priority for every politician regardless of background and that surely this is something that they should all agree on Very idealistic, but touching nonetheless.So I enjoyed parts of this book, but in all honestly lost interest by about halfway through the book Nonetheless, the topics addressed are very pertinent issues and I agree that targetting them should be a global concern I thought the book was very strong on its main point, which is that the social determinants of health are really important, and underappreciated I agree with that, and with most maybe all of his policy views that result from that orientation.He s not an awesome writer but he s engaging enough in style and choice of anecdote, he comes up with some powerful metaphors like how much the expected life span of a person changes with every stop or in every few seconds if you head north from midtown I thought the book was very strong on its main point, which is that the social determinants of health are really important, and underappreciated I agree with that, and with most maybe all of his policy views that result from that orientation.He s not an awesome writer but he s engaging enough in style and choice of anecdote, he comes up with some powerful metaphors like how much the expected life span of a person changes with every stop or in every few seconds if you head north from midtown manhattan on a subway , and there s plenty of data and research presented in support of his points.Why three stars I thought he was generally snarky and condescending to views other than his own And in particular he basically hates economists and the financial industry disclosure I work in the finance industry, and tend to like economists and seemed to take plenty of potshots in their direction, sometimes in ways that advanced his narrative and sometimes just randomly And his knowledge of, and accuracy in, these areas is low E.g when saying we could get rid of worldwide deep poverty actually I think it was some subset poverty in slums for 100bn, which might seem likethan we could possibly collect, but somehow we found 11 trillion to give banks during the financial crisis issues he s probably wrong on the 100bn but less debatably, he s comparing a one time cost to an annual cost without acknowledging it, and the 11 trillion was not given but in fact loaned or invested and ultimately made a small profit, so he s comparing gifts to loans which he inaccurately labels as gifts Those might sound like nitpicks but actually they are really important differences, and it made me basically wonder what else was wrong in other cases where I happened to not be as familiar with the facts I got this book for free at a health conference, and was fairly uninspired to finish this book While he made a few insightful observations, and I appreciate his contributions to the global dialogue, I do not recommend reading this book for several reasons 1 If you remotely follow health policy these days, most of what he shares is fairly common knowledge and doesn t go very in depth 2 He is fairly lax with when and how he presents data, often implying that correlation is causation 3 The I got this book for free at a health conference, and was fairly uninspired to finish this book While he made a few insightful observations, and I appreciate his contributions to the global dialogue, I do not recommend reading this book for several reasons 1 If you remotely follow health policy these days, most of what he shares is fairly common knowledge and doesn t go very in depth 2 He is fairly lax with when and how he presents data, often implying that correlation is causation 3 The book was very repetitive, and seemed to jump around at times 4 He spoke way too much about himself, which got very irritating and 5 He makes some inappropriate comments that fail to respect diversity e.g., If you are severely disabled another five years of life may seem a lot less attractive than another five years of golf, opera, and luxury travel and In focusing on mothers in my discussion of the trade off between employment and childcare costs , I am not diminishing the role fathers might, or even should, have I am simply reflecting the usual So you d rather reflect the usual than change your language from mothers to parent While I tend to agree with the overarching points Marmot makes, and think it s a very important topic, I thought the book itself could have been half the length and still make those points effectively He says the same thing over and over and over again, or even in some ways repeatedly hints at the points but sayson this later I think this would be good for someone new to the topic of health disparities, or someone whose profession isn t in health care but is interested in learning abou While I tend to agree with the overarching points Marmot makes, and think it s a very important topic, I thought the book itself could have been half the length and still make those points effectively He says the same thing over and over and over again, or even in some ways repeatedly hints at the points but sayson this later I think this would be good for someone new to the topic of health disparities, or someone whose profession isn t in health care but is interested in learning about health it s clear and straightforward, very approachable `DOWNLOAD E-PUB ↡ La salute disuguale ↚ La povert non un destino e nulla di ci che riguarda le iniquit di salute inevitabile Le disuguaglianze di salute nascono dalle disuguaglianze nella societ e solo intervenendo sui determinanti sociali possibile ridurre la palese e ingiusta differenza nella distribuzione della salute che esiste sia tra paesi sia all interno di uno stesso paese Con una prosa vivace e con accenti di tagliente e a tratti esilarante ironia, Marmot racconta di incontri e dibattiti a cui ha partecipato nel corso della sua intensa attivit di ricerca e di prevenzione delle cause sociali delle malattie e cos facendo discute i fondamenti filosofici della giustizia sociale esamina teorie economiche e la ricaduta della loro applicazione sulle realt di diversi paesi e sulle vite reali delle persone presenta dati epidemiologici e, sulla base di forti evidenze scientifiche, propone soluzioni per promuovere un equa distribuzione di salute il messaggio centrale di questo libro infatti che le cose possono cambiare Marmot si rivolge innanzitutto alle amministrazioni locali e ai governi nazionali affinch adottino politiche utili non solo al superamento della deprivazione che crea iniquit di salute, ma anche al potenziamento della capacit delle persone di fare scelte responsabili per la propria salute e il proprio benessere Ma tutti sono invitati a contribuire al cambiamento e ciascuno pu giocare un ruolo attivo per migliorare l ambiente sociale e dare alle persone la libert di condurre esistenze a cui ha senso dare valore