( Read Book ) á Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms: The Spyhunter, the Fashion Designer & the Man From Moscow ð eBook or Kindle ePUB free

( Read Book ) ⚟ Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms: The Spyhunter, the Fashion Designer & the Man From Moscow ⚦ Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Room provides the first comprehensive account of what was once hailed by a leading American newspaper as the greatest spy story of World War II This dramatic yet little known saga, replete with telephone taps, kidnappings, and police surveillance, centres on the furtive escapades of Tyler Kent, a handsome, womanisingyear old Ivy League graduate, who doubles as a US Embassy code clerk and Soviet agent Against the backdrop of London high society during the so called Phoney War, Kent s life intersects with the lives of the book s two other memorably flamboyant protagonists One of those is Maxwell Knight, an urbane, endearingly eccentric MI spyhunter The other is Anna Wolkoff, a White Russian fashion designer and Nazi spy whose outfits are worn by the Duchess of Windsor and whose parents are friends of the British royal family Wolkoff belongs to a fascist secret society called the Right Club, which aims to overthrow the British government Her romantic entanglement with Tyler Kent gives her access to a secret correspondence between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, a correspondence that has the potential to transform the outcome of the war Overly detailed. This is a truly fascinating tale of intrigue, espionage and treason, which is set in the early days of the second world war The three main figures include Anna Wolkoff, a couturier whose White Russian parents ran the popular Russian Tea Rooms, a young American named Tyler Gatewood Kent and Maxwell Knight possibly better known as M This book ranges from a few years before the war and takes us up to 1945 with an epilogue which explains what happened to all the people we meet along the way Al This is a truly fascinating tale of intrigue, espionage and treason, which is set in the early days of the second world war The three main figures include Anna Wolkoff, a couturier whose White Russian parents ran the popular Russian Tea Rooms, a young American named Tyler Gatewood Kent and Maxwell Knight possibly better known as M This book ranges from a few years before the war and takes us up to 1945 with an epilogue which explains what happened to all the people we meet along the way Although this is a long read, it is utterly engrossing and I was sorry when I finally got to the end The author unfolds the events of those years methodically, but his writing is never dry In fact, at times this almost reads as a thriller We begin in Russia, where Tyler Kent works in the translation section of the American Embassy Resentful and arrogant, he begins to spy for money and, when sent to London, he is displeased at his new posting he would have much preferred the Berlin Embassy, which had some profitable currency scams in place and is soon up to his old tricks again Handsome, charming and certainly always wishing to live beyond his means, Tyler Kent had no qualms whatsoever at copying extremely sensitive documents and telegrams many between Churchill and Roosevelt It is easy to look back on the war with hindsight and not comprehend the obvious concern with which Britain imagined it was about to be invaded With German troops marching into some countries virtually unchallenged, there was a feeling of when England was to be invaded, rather than if it would be In 1939 and 1940, there was an air of crisis in the country and a real fear of imminent invasion as well as the concern of Fifth Columnists, who were eager to welcome the invading Germans Maxwell Knight ran many agents whose job it was to infiltrate groups who were acting in possibly treasonous ways One of the groups that Maxwell Knight was interested in was the Right Club and Anna Wolkoff was recruiting for them.What follows is an investigation, in which Knight is led to Tyler s activities through his meeting with Anna Wolkoff Wolkoff was extremely involved in the right wing politics of those times On the fringe of the aristocratic world, Wolkoff was struggling financially and as resentful and unhappy as Tyler Kent with her reduced circumstances While bemoaning her lot, she eagerly attempted to involve virtually anyone she met into her political orbit and happily spent her time daubing anti Semitic slogans on shops and busying herself in intrigues and secrets Knight believed her dangerous and spent a great deal of time investigating her and her circle.This book has many characters that you will know, from Dennis Wheatley to William Joyce and Oswald Mosley, to those you will not agents who did potentially dangerous undercover work without recognition Knight certainly respected his agents and disliked the way they were looked down on by government officials He was patient, careful and willing to give his agents time to come up with results I found this an extremely interesting read and if you have any interest in espionage or in the early years of the war, then you will certainly enjoy this very much This shows how widespread fascist views were at the beginning of the war with some extremely wealthy and powerful people in England expressing what can only be viewed as treasonable sentiments, and how people like Maxwell Knight, and his agents, were aware of the potential damage these people could cause especially in the event of invasion I recommend this book highly and think it would make both a wonderful individual and book group read Lastly, I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review Paul Willetts has surpassed himself with this stunning book There s much to enjoy in this comprehensive account of one of the greatest spy stories of World War 2 The book s three main protagonists alongside a host of fascinating supporting characters are Maxwell Knight, an endearingly eccentric MI5 spyhunter who works alone and largely unsupported Knight s tireless work uncovers a plot by fifth columnists many of whom are unpleasant anti semetic, Nazi approving toffs hoping to facili Paul Willetts has surpassed himself with this stunning book There s much to enjoy in this comprehensive account of one of the greatest spy stories of World War 2 The book s three main protagonists alongside a host of fascinating supporting characters are Maxwell Knight, an endearingly eccentric MI5 spyhunter who works alone and largely unsupported Knight s tireless work uncovers a plot by fifth columnists many of whom are unpleasant anti semetic, Nazi approving toffs hoping to facilitate a Nazi takeover in Britain Anna Wolkoff, a White Russian fashion designer and Nazi sympathiser whose parents are acquainted with the British royal family Wolkoff belongs to a fascist group called the Right Club, which aims to overthrow the British government Wolkoff becomes romantically entangled with Tyler Kent, a handsome, womanising 28 year old Ivy League graduate, whose work as a US Embassy code clerk gives him access to a secret correspondence between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill This correspondence, were it to have been made public, could have changed the outcome of World War 2 Rendezvous at the Russian Tea Rooms The Spyhunter, the Fashion Designer the Man From Moscow frequently readslike a thriller than a non fiction book Paul Willetts is especially skilled at recreating the era in London As I worked my way through this book I frequently pondered just how much research Paul Willetts must have undertaken The answer comes at the book s conclusion in a section entitled Sourcesaround a million words of notes, amassed over a period in excess of ten yearsPaul Willetts goes on to explain that whilst the finished book possesses the feel of a novel it is not an exercise in so called faction and is unequivocally a work of non fiction The end result is a methodical, thorough book that, whilst lengthy, is engrossing, compelling and fascinating from start to finish Highly recommended.5 5 There s a mildly interesting story here but it s lost in a welter of extraneous detail, going far beyond the requirements of a fully fleshed out depiction I suspect it was in part to disguise the relative unimportance of the whole business in the grand scheme of the war and espionage Willetts tried to make the case that Kent potentially controlled the outcome of the 1940 US presidential election, but that s a reach way too far.