@KINDLE ⚻ The End of Ignorance: Multiplying Our Human Potential Ä eBook or E-pub free

While fairly interesting, this book seems to be an ad for the author s jump system Some of the examples provided were interesting, if only the author could get off selling himself long enough to say something substantial Fairly light reading. One very important look on the current affairs in a GLOBAL Climate I couldn t agreeon the Solidarity of HUMANITY.. @KINDLE Í The End of Ignorance: Multiplying Our Human Potential é A revolutionary call for a new understanding of how people learnThe End of Ignorance conceives of a world in which no child is left behind a world based on the assumption that each child has the potential to be successful in every subject John Mighton argues that by recognizing the barriers that we have experienced in our own educational development, by identifying the moment that we became disenchanted with a certain subject and forever closed ourselves off to it, we will be able to eliminate these same barriers from standing in the way of our children A passionate examination of our present education system, The End of Ignorance shows how we all can work together to reinvent the way that we are taughtJohn Mighton, the author of The Myth of Ability, is the founder of JUMP Math, a system of learning based on the fostering of emergent intelligence The program has proved so successful an entire class of Gradestudents, including so called slow learners, scored over % on a Grademath test A group of British children who had effectively been written off as too unruly responded so enthusiastically and had such impressive results using the JUMP method that the school board has adopted the program Inspired by the work he has done with thousands of students, Mighton shows us why we must not underestimate how much ground can be covered one small step at a time, and challenges us to re examine the assumptions underlying current educational theory He pays attention to how kids pay attention, chronicles what captures their imaginations, and explains why their sense of self confidence and ability to focus are as important to their academic success at school as the content of their lessons This book divesinto the reflections of the JUMP Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies It presentsof the early case studies of the program that Mighton developed It begins to lead into the Brain Science, which his third book, All Things Being Equal, cover in detail. Well, this was definitelyof a book than the Myth of Ability, but I m not sure it benefited from the extra length I liked that it was muchpolished and had some research, but it was still mostly anecdotal I personally agreed with a lot of his logic, but I can see how it wouldn t be very convincing.To read Understanding and Remembering Number FactsMathematics and NatureMathematics and SportsMathematics and Secret CodesMathematics and ArtApplications and Misapplications of Cognitive Ps Well, this was definitelyof a book than the Myth of Ability, but I m not sure it benefited from the extra length I liked that it was muchpolished and had some research, but it was still mostly anecdotal I personally agreed with a lot of his logic, but I can see how it wouldn t be very convincing.To read Understanding and Remembering Number FactsMathematics and NatureMathematics and SportsMathematics and Secret CodesMathematics and ArtApplications and Misapplications of Cognitive Psychology to Mathematics Education John Anderson, Lynn Reder, and Herb Simon Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not Work An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist, Discover, Problem Based, Experiential and Inquiry Based Teaching Paul Kirschner, John Sweller, Richard Clark Inside the Black Box Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment Paul Black, Dylan Williams A Brief History of American K 12 Mathematics Education in the 20th Century This is a thought provoking book, primarily about elementary math education Mighton is the founder of the JUMP math program, which started as a tutoring program but has now been used as the math curriculum in some schools Mighton elaborates on the philosophy behind JUMP his starting point is the belief that every child can do math and its main components He focuses a great deal on the importance of confidence and attention children can only math by devoting attention to it, and they will o This is a thought provoking book, primarily about elementary math education Mighton is the founder of the JUMP math program, which started as a tutoring program but has now been used as the math curriculum in some schools Mighton elaborates on the philosophy behind JUMP his starting point is the belief that every child can do math and its main components He focuses a great deal on the importance of confidence and attention children can only math by devoting attention to it, and they will only be willing to devote attention to it if they feel confident that they can succeed Mighton makes a lot of good arguments, backed up mostly by his personal experience and the experience of other teachers using JUMP Some of his ideas are probably quite controversial in education circles for instance, he believes that procedural understanding can lead to conceptual understanding, while recent fashion seems to be to try to get students to use the concepts to come up with their own procedures.The last few chapters of the book focuson the issues with current educational research parts of this felt petty , as well as Mighton s vision of a world in which children are all educated to their full potential I may be cynical, but this felt like a pipe dream Ultimately, I found this book valuable mostly because it offers a different perspective on ways to teach children math Since it is based mostly on Mighton s personal experiences, I m not convinced that the ideas in it are necessarily the best nor does he claim that they are , but they definitely made me think This book is about educational theory, commenting on how we, and kids specifically, can learn almost anything The book is supposed to be about learning in general, but it goes in detail about the JUMP math program, and as this was writtne by the creator of this program, it is no surprise, but he failed to give many examples of outside uses of his arguments.Either way, I thought his points were good, and it actually got me excited about teaching math to my kids one day His principles are based This book is about educational theory, commenting on how we, and kids specifically, can learn almost anything The book is supposed to be about learning in general, but it goes in detail about the JUMP math program, and as this was writtne by the creator of this program, it is no surprise, but he failed to give many examples of outside uses of his arguments.Either way, I thought his points were good, and it actually got me excited about teaching math to my kids one day His principles are based on not trying to make the material interesting to the kids who we don t understand, so often fail badly , but making the kids interested in the material through encouragement, and success It was a great book, and I would recommend it to any educator This book reads like the author was insulted when other educators weren t wowed by his teaching approach It would have benefited from a strong editor who would have cut the repetition of the same anecdotes and most likely have cut the length by at least a 1 3rd Mighton does have good things to say, but his manner of doing so isannoying than enlightening. Mighton s view on the interdependence of abstract and concrete thought in children and its applications are fascinating. This book is basically a defence of the author s JUMP Math program, detailing the reasoning behind various aspects of the program From what I ve read not just in this book , it seems like a very successful program and I m all for anything that keeps kids interested in math There was also a lot that rang very true and accorded well with what I read in The Knowledge Gap , which isabout literacy and reading I wound up highlighting many passages in the book.The chapter towards the end whe This book is basically a defence of the author s JUMP Math program, detailing the reasoning behind various aspects of the program From what I ve read not just in this book , it seems like a very successful program and I m all for anything that keeps kids interested in math There was also a lot that rang very true and accorded well with what I read in The Knowledge Gap , which isabout literacy and reading I wound up highlighting many passages in the book.The chapter towards the end where he complains about math consultants who are against his program was a bit ill advised, to be honest it makes the whole book feel like an advertisement I agree with him that the state of educational research is pretty dour, but it could have been worded better and not just as an attack against people who have rejected his program.The first part was pretty good, though Similarly to The Knowledge Gap , the most inspiring message of the book is that any kid, even those labelled as having learning disabilities, can learn math if it is broken down into small, comprehensible steps