`Download Kindle ó The Enforcer: Spilotro, The Chicago Mob's Man Over Las Vegas ê eBook or Kindle ePUB free

`Download Kindle ⚦ The Enforcer: Spilotro, The Chicago Mob's Man Over Las Vegas ⚣ Bugsy Siegel built Las Vegas, but it was Tony The Ant Spilotro who ran the show Now William F Roemer, Jr veteran FBI agent and scourge of the Cosa Nostra, tells the shocking story of how a teenage wiseguy grew up to become the man in Vegas From the gritty streets of Chicago to the neon lit Nevada wonderland, Roemer assembles a rogue s gallery of the highest ranking capos and the lowest creeps of organized crime As incredible as any work of fiction but it s all fact A good book about Chicago mobster Tony Spilotro and how he was sent to Las Vegas by the mob to protect there interest in the Casinos Anyone who has seen Casino knows what happened to Tony and his brother Michael in the brutal ending The only problem with this book is that the author Bill Roemor tends to kiss his own ass so many times that I m suprised he didn t throw his back out. After 200 pages of Roemer s autobiographical hero worship that was even less relevant than in Accardo, I was rooting for Spilotro at the end. Some good details, poorly written.by a writer that thinks too highly of himself.This book is about mafia enforcer and hitman Tony Spilotro, that was immortalized as Nicky Santoro played by Joe Pesci in Casino, it is written by an FBI agent that had a number of run ins with Spilotro thru out the years.While Spilotro is by all accounts accurately described in the book, and Roemer seems to have a real dislike for the subject of this book, but on the other hand the author comes across as having Some good details, poorly written.by a writer that thinks too highly of himself.This book is about mafia enforcer and hitman Tony Spilotro, that was immortalized as Nicky Santoro played by Joe Pesci in Casino, it is written by an FBI agent that had a number of run ins with Spilotro thru out the years.While Spilotro is by all accounts accurately described in the book, and Roemer seems to have a real dislike for the subject of this book, but on the other hand the author comes across as having such a high impression of himself that it grows tiresome very quickly, the arrogance just drips off the page, and while he seems to genuinely dislike Spilotro there are a half dozen other mobsters mentioned in the book that he apparently finds to be nice guys.and I recall at least 3 or 4 cases of police and FBI agents that turned to crime and got arrested themselves and the author brushes this off with a simple I guess the stress just got to them.all I can say is that the author seems to be a weird judge of character