.Ebook ⚐ The Telephone Booth Indian ⚈ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

I read this book in bits and pieces sometimes over and over again Like Joseph Mitchell s stories it reminds me of the New York my father told me about, the New York I remember very vaguely from early childhood with the pre memory sense of familiarity which could have come from the stories your parents told you This is a fantastic book to read if you want to become a good writer, and if you like this book I suggest reading some Joseph Mitchell. And again, and again I have the North Point ed., and it was reissued in this series, which I reviewed in 2003, and which, sad to say, seems to have ceased publication soon thereafter Not because of me, I don t think.So in several ways, they don t make em like this any Some of that is probably a good thing as this article by Jack Shafer points out, Liebling made stuff up Which is sorta disappointing, but also not that surprising I m not sure anyone, not even the promoters and shysters And again, and again I have the North Point ed., and it was reissued in this series, which I reviewed in 2003, and which, sad to say, seems to have ceased publication soon thereafter Not because of me, I don t think.So in several ways, they don t make em like this any Some of that is probably a good thing as this article by Jack Shafer points out, Liebling made stuff up Which is sorta disappointing, but also not that surprising I m not sure anyone, not even the promoters and shysters and scammers Liebling profiles here, could be as consistently quotable as they are here And I don t care much, even though Shafer s article makes a bunch of entirely convincing arguments that I should I guess I think of this as just as much a collection of short stories about NYC roguery as a set of journalistic profiles of real people They re still great pieces about life at the margins of respectability, in the whole NYC demimonde of the 30s I always picture this era in black and white when I imagine living there, which is both understandable and dumb of me, with a swing soundtrack And this furnishes the laugh track, and the street smarts, and all the ways I d know to make a dollar, as they say.Read it two or three times once for the plot, again for the zesty language, and again for the sheer joy Liebling takes in constructing and living the pieces Even if they re not, you know, totally true A collection of sharp and smart essays written in the 1930 s by an ace reporter about the hucksters and con men of the day Mostly engaging and hilarious, except for The Boy in the Pistachio Suit about the history of a newspaper syndicate. So I picked Liebling at Home up at the central branch of the San Diego library, solely for the purpose of reading The Telephone Booth Indian and The Honest Rainmaker , which are long OOP TTBI contains 10 chapters, each a piece written for The New Yorker between 1937 and 1942 Other writings from this period are contained in Back Where I Came From , which also contains the remaining stories that are included in TJB By the way, there was no building called Jollity in NYC it is either a c So I picked Liebling at Home up at the central branch of the San Diego library, solely for the purpose of reading The Telephone Booth Indian and The Honest Rainmaker , which are long OOP TTBI contains 10 chapters, each a piece written for The New Yorker between 1937 and 1942 Other writings from this period are contained in Back Where I Came From , which also contains the remaining stories that are included in TJB By the way, there was no building called Jollity in NYC it is either a composite of several buildings on Broadway, or primarily the Brill Building What this material has in common is Liebling s fondness for writing about the unusual people living in New York City at the time In fact, it s hard to imagine these sorts of people surviving in today s NYC for one thing, the streets and buildings have been transformed over the decades into infrastructures that could not possibly support these curious livelihoods The sorts of scams and cons he writes about have now moved into cyberspace.But that s what I find so charming about Joe s books he describes a world so different from ours, and does so with bemusement and just terrific turns of phrase He often provides direct quotes from his subjects, so you can relish the 1930 s NY speak and the subjective realities of some really colorful characters.Having said that, some of the pieces in TTBI are not really compelling I found the piece on the Schuberts and their success on Broadway rather stiff, which surprised me The piece on the Scripps Howard publishing empire is a lot better so far, every bit of his writing about the press I ve read has been interesting and revealing about publishers Also, these early sports pieces were disappointing, full of details that I found pretty boring, actually The piece on the rise of the hat check business in NYC was good, though This one is probablylike three and a half stars, but I rounded it up to encourage new readers of Liebling.The Scripps name is familiar to all of us San Diego residents E.W Scripps bought a ranch here in 1898 for health reasons and named it Miramar his publishing empire was headquartered in Ohio Early on he founded the Scripps Institute of Oceanography 1903 HIs ranch lands now make up the bedroom community of Scripps Ranch and the Miramar Naval Air Station this was recommended by luc sante, who wrote the introduction liebling s a new yorker writer from way back when, and this is a series of essay on broadway con men and riff raff in the 40s it s excellent I no longer own this book I was so fond of it that I had to give it away.Liebling is incredible Though he lacks the soft, nostalgic heart of Joseph Mitchell, he captures the rough edges of old New York s hustlers and promoters perfectly. .Ebook ☹ The Telephone Booth Indian ⚇ A classic work on Broadway sharpers, grifters, and con men by the late, great New Yorker journalist A J LieblingOften referred to as Liebling lowlife pieces, the essays in The Telephone Booth Indian boisterously celebrate raffishness A J Liebling appreciated a good scam and knew how to cultivate the scammers Telephone Booth Indians entrepreneurs so impecunious that they conduct business from telephone booths in the lobbies of New York City office buildings and a host of other petty nomads of Broadway with names like Marty the Clutch and Count de Pennies are the protagonists in this incomparable Liebling work In The Telephone Booth Indian, Liebling proves just why he was the go to man on New York lowlife and con culture this is the master at the top of his form, uncovering scam after scam and writing about them with the wit and charisma that established him as one of the greatest journalists of his generation and one of New York s finest cultural chroniclers Interesting vignettes of Depression era life in New York The day to day activities of small time businessmen, crooks, athletes, and others are finely shown Liebling s bias shows but this is worth the read in being a time capsule to a bygone age. Reprint of a look from 1945 of the way New York was before and during the depression Filled with bookies, boxers, producers and hat girls Fun read about New York in the early part of the 20th century Chapters cover the Shuberts, boxers and the creating of coat checks.