@Download Book ⚝ The Time of the Uprooted ⚥ eBook or E-pub free

Review The Time of The Uprooted by Elie Wiesel.I thought the novel was well written but filled with unjust hope and despair I have read some of Elie Wiesel 19s non fiction and got through the rough parts but this story hit a lot of triggers for me at this time The story kept me in deep thought while reading about the main character, Gamaliel 19s low life thoughts and perils that he brought on to himself Yes, I feel he was a Hungarian refugee, he had no home, no nation, and he never did achie Review The Time of The Uprooted by Elie Wiesel.I thought the novel was well written but filled with unjust hope and despair I have read some of Elie Wiesel 19s non fiction and got through the rough parts but this story hit a lot of triggers for me at this time The story kept me in deep thought while reading about the main character, Gamaliel 19s low life thoughts and perils that he brought on to himself Yes, I feel he was a Hungarian refugee, he had no home, no nation, and he never did achieve anything because of lack of happiness Gamaliel chose that life, only knowing four other lost souls that he hung around with at a coffee shop through his adult life Where they friends Not really, they all got together on occasions to discuss, argue, share stories but not any buddy, buddy emotions or behavior They were refugees, living a separate life from each other, with different viewpoints and it was just an unusual coincident that they meet when they moved to America.Gamaliel was the narrator throughout the book and I thought his character was somewhat of a low life person Elie Wiesel created the environment subdued to capture the reader 19s vision of this man as someone who has no real life Gamaliel 19s parents gave him up at five years old, when they knew they were being deported to the concentration camps during the invasion of Poland to a woman named Ilonka She was a Christian cabaret singer who also was a prostitute in order to stay alive She could never take the place as his mother but he did over the years care for her Once he was of age he went out on his own but his behavior and attitude got him in trouble so he went to America knowing no one but still with a very low self esteem and began his life unhappy and depressed That seemed to be his nature throughout the novel His whole life it seemed he was seeking something but would he ever recognize it when he found it He did get married, had two children but that ended because he wouldn 19t let go of the past As his children got older that started hating him with the help from their mother 19s comments and abrupt hatred she had for Gamaliel His life with women were unsettling from that point on so his state of mind was always filled with bitterness towards others and mostly towards himself until one day he met a doctor who introduced him to an elderly unrecognizable woman because of scars to her face and body, who was Hungarian This woman was in a hospice and Gamaliel had a feeling he knew her but he could not recognize her and she hadn 19t spoken in years and was near death She finally lapse into a coma but Gamaliel kept visiting her in hopes to figure out who she was The ending was like the rest of the book, sad but I felt a sigh of relief 26. Another moving book from Wiesel, about people trying to live well in an almost permanent state of dislocation and tragedy He offers a reminder of an all too common human condition and our all too common capacity to disregard this territory of suffering and alienation, and those who live in it Those whom we might, in fact, be placing in that land through our own actions and inaction.My only complaint was stylistic, came early, and melted away as the novel wore on Near the beginning, a child ch Another moving book from Wiesel, about people trying to live well in an almost permanent state of dislocation and tragedy He offers a reminder of an all too common human condition and our all too common capacity to disregard this territory of suffering and alienation, and those who live in it Those whom we might, in fact, be placing in that land through our own actions and inaction.My only complaint was stylistic, came early, and melted away as the novel wore on Near the beginning, a child character delivered some stilted dialogue It felt at first like a bit of puppetry, a clumsy way for the author to wax poetical about some of his ideas However, as Wiesel familiarized me with the world in which these people lived, I began to imagine why he might have done this how this was not puppetry at all, but rather a demonstration of the sorts of tics people might develop when they have been exiled from normalcy, from peace, from acceptance.Isn t my judgment of a person s strangeness really, in the end, judgment of the fact that they lived through what I am a stranger to Aren t I rendering petty critiques of the best, awkward thing they could build from what remained to them after what they went through A point is made in this book of the power of silence Not the malicious, willfully ignorant or conspiratorial kind, but rather a different silence of power, ineffability, reverence, mourning, humbleness, careful attention Maybe, in a strange way, one valid responses to strangeness and suffering is not to do further violence by carrying on in response, but instead to offer this particular, deliberate form of silence @Download Book ⛑ The Time of the Uprooted ⚢ From Elie Wiesel, a profoundly moving novel about the healing power of compassionGamaliel Friedman is only a child when his family flees Czechoslovakia infor the relative safety of Hungary For him, it will be the beginning of a life of rootlessness, disguise, and longing Five years later, in desperation, Gamaliel s parents entrust him to a young Christian cabaret singer named Ilonka With his Jewish identity hidden, he survives the war, but in , to escape the stranglehold of communism, he leaves Budapest after painfully parting with IlonkaHe settles in Vienna, then Paris, and finally, after a failed marriage, in New York, where he works as a ghostwriter, living through the lives of others Eventually, he falls in with a group of exiles a Spanish Civil War veteran, a survivor of the Warsaw ghetto, a victim of Stalinism, a former Israeli intelligence agent, and a rabbi a mystic whose belief in the potential for grace in everyday life powerfully counters Gamaliel s feelings of loss and dispossession When Gamaliel is asked to help draw out an elderly, disfigured Hungarian woman who is barely able to communicate but who may be his beloved Ilonka, he begins to understand that a real life in the present is possible only if he will reconcile with his pastAching, unsentimental, deeply affecting, and thought provoking, The Time of the Uprooted is the work of a master My review published in the San Francisco Chronicle in 2005 The Time of the Uprooted By Elie Wiesel, translated by David Hapgood KNOPF 300 PAGES 25 Elie Wiesel has been a public figure so long that his ideas and warnings have at times taken on a too familiar air, despite their timeless importance It has already been 20 years since Wiesel played his most prominent public role, famously imploring President Ronald Re My review published in the San Francisco Chronicle in 2005 The Time of the Uprooted By Elie Wiesel, translated by David Hapgood KNOPF 300 PAGES 25 Elie Wiesel has been a public figure so long that his ideas and warnings have at times taken on a too familiar air, despite their timeless importance It has already been 20 years since Wiesel played his most prominent public role, famously imploring President Ronald Reagan not to visit a German cemetery in Bitburg containing the graves of 49 former SS officers Mr President, I have seen children I have seen them being thrown in the flames alive, Wiesel said in 1985 May I, Mr President, if it s possible at all, implore you to do something else, to find another way, another site That place, Mr President, is not your place Your place is with the victims of the SS Wiesel s place, it was clear, was always on the side of those victims He was, as the press accounts never failed to mention, a survivor of the camps, and he was a symbol, neverso than in 1986 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize But Wiesel has chafed under this familiar role, and in his new novel, The Time of the Uprooted, featuring a tormented Holocaust survivor named Gamaliel and his close circle of friends and fellow survivors , Wiesel s anger lashes out in what some might consider surprising directions Survivor he writes For a long time now, Gamaliel s reaction to the word has been that it was cheapened, made a cliche, used in all kinds of situations Everybody wanted to be one No need to have undergone a selection at Birkenau or the tortures of Treblinka It was sufficient to have lived, to have survived, in a Europe occupied or even threatened by Germany after Hitler had come to power Wiesel s anger is hot enough to scald How many times Gamaliel had heard some hapless speaker trying to win the audience s sympathy by declaiming, We are all survivors Of course, I was born in Manhattan, but I could have been born in Lodz or Krakow Didn t they realize that if everyone is a potential or virtual survivor, then no one is a true survivor How to explain to them that, confronted with such deception, those who did indeed survive come to be ashamed of having really been there How to tell them to let remembrance rest in peace, because the dead took its key with them when they disappeared in smoke up the chimney Gamaliel lives in Brooklyn, where he carves out a living as a ghostwriter and searches for meaning under the tutelage of a great man, Rebbe Zusya, whom he first meets years earlier in the Jewish quarter of postwar Casablanca Gamaliel is at the time under the spell of Esther, a mysterious palm reader from Morocco he has met on a ship to Israel, and travels in search of her, but in vain Later, Gamaliel meets the rabbi again in Brooklyn, and they continue their dialogue, which makes such an impression on Gamaliel that he uses it to develop a character he calls the Holy Fool for his never to be completed life s work, a novel, bits of which are scattered throughout The Time of the Uprooted Wiesel does a lot of scattering, in fact Besides Esther, Gamaliel also painfully recalls his ex wife, Colette, the mother of his estranged twin daughters, whose suicide he seems to see almost as a testament to how much she hated him another former love, Eve, who leaves him for another man, the charismatic but transparently dangerous Sama l and, most hauntingly, he looks back at the Hungarian cabaret singer Ilonka, who takes him in as a boy in wartime Budapest, despite great peril to herself, and schools the boy on never, ever telling anyone he is a Jew Between all this looking back, Gamaliel spends time with a colorful group of friends who work together on behalf of uprooted people The friends first met in Paris in the postwar years and all are weighted down with stories too terrible to tell, although sometimes they tell them anyway Gad, the most silent of the group, one day spills a tale of working undercover for Israel s Mossad in an Arabic capital, speaking with a German accent and posing as a wealthy former Nazi, and meeting a woman a French journalist he could have loved instead, someone whispers into her ear that he is a Nazi, and she is overcome with the kind of hatred that crackles like a high voltage line I didn t realize that such intelligence and such hatred could coexist in one person, Gad tells the group He wants to tell the French journalist that he, too, is a Jew and that I m entitled to love you and be loved by you, but his Mossad training is so thorough, he doesn t even blush Later, the day after he resigns from the Mossad, he travels to Paris and calls the woman s magazine, determined to meet with her and tell her the truth But he can t speak with her she has died of cancer Gamaliel has stories he wants to keep quiet about, too, but he is prodded toward exploring his past when he is summoned to a hospital to meet with a mysterious older woman of Hungarian origin who might possibly be Ilonka, his protector in Budapest, whom he has not seen in many years The woman in the hospital is in poor health and won t speak, thus dragging out the mystery And Gamaliel finds himself drawn to a female doctor in the hospital She has painful stories, too, and a bond forms It would be unfair to Wiesel to give too much of the story away, as a little suspense helps provide the impetus to keep wading through various digressions, many of them moving and difficult enough to bring tears Especially unforgettable is Wiesel s evocation of the day the Russian troops arrive in Budapest and show up in Ilonka s apartment to drag her away to be punished as a collaborator The young boy Gamaliel dares to admit that he s a Jew, and in the process saves Ilonka and himself The book does contain one strange lapse Near the end, the Brooklyn religious leader whom Gamaliel so admires, Rebbe Zusya, summons him to what might be his deathbed Gamaliel expects to be told something important, but in fact, the rabbi has a request He calls on Gamaliel to bring to his side Sama l, this heretic acquaintance of yours This is a true stunner Wiesel has set up this odd Sama l as a mysterious figure, a seducer and liar, and the notion of seeing him square off with the wise and learned rabbi carries immediate excitement, a potentially great scene like something out of Hermann Hesse Thirty two pages later, the novel ends with no further mention of Rebbe Zusya The lapse is confusing, but not ineffective Like the new Monument to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, which is intended to disorient visitors and strip away their preconceptions, Wiesel s novel has both a deceptive ordinariness and a hypnotic quality He wants to pull the reader in, but also to provoke, and never sacrifices either pursuit in this brave, humbling novel Steve Kettmann, a former Chronicle reporter, lives in Berlin.http sfgate.com cgi bin article.cgiThis article appeared on page F 2 of the San Francisco Chronicle Somewhat dated, somewhat hard to follow, but the end message is optimistic, as the narrator thinks again about getting involved in a relationship with a female He seems to have no insight why the other relationships didn t work out, but this may be typical of male thinking Much philosophical discussion, if you like that. DNF I think this is the first book of Eli Wiesel s books that I have not finished I tried, I really did, but I couldn t follow the story It was all over the place back in time, current time it was just impossible for me to follow It s a shame because the storyline sounded like it would be interesting I m afraid that I have too many other books on my list to read to spend too much time on a book that I m not getting into. Beautiful but heartbreaking Generational PTSD caused by the Holocaust and war in general With so much loss, what does one dare to cling to I really wanted to give this a higher rating and I read wayof it than I should have The characters and the story did not pull me in as I had expected. WOW I love Professor Wiesel and his ability to use words so beautifully I cannot recommend this book highly enough It is not only a beautiful story, it is also filled with beautiful words and terrific insight into human nature Here are a few of the MANY quotes that I found as I read this book I look around for my benefactor He s vanished But he was there at the right time, as if he had lived only to appear at my side when I needed an ally A helping hand from fate The cynics are wrong WOW I love Professor Wiesel and his ability to use words so beautifully I cannot recommend this book highly enough It is not only a beautiful story, it is also filled with beautiful words and terrific insight into human nature Here are a few of the MANY quotes that I found as I read this book I look around for my benefactor He s vanished But he was there at the right time, as if he had lived only to appear at my side when I needed an ally A helping hand from fate The cynics are wrong David Hume and Nikos Kazantzakis are right Everything that happens in our human universe is mysteriously linked to everything else A breeze whispers through the trees without disturbing their branches Whence does it come Who sent it To stir what memories Rebbe Nahman of Bratslav believed the wind carried messages from unhappy princes to their brides, who had been carried off by the forest spirits In Hebrew, the word for wind is the same as for breath and spirit But nowadays, people use the word to express disdain No need to listen to what he has to say it s just wind Gamaliel, on the other hand, takes it seriously if only it would agree to take a message to his daughters Time and again, she d told him she believed in miracles, but she always added a warning My boy, if you want the Lord to help you, then you must help Him It s too difficult, even for Him, unless you help We mustn t expect Him to deal alone with all the madmen and imbeciles and scoundrels who make trouble in this poor little world of His, where there are so manysinners than saints Why should we expect Him to carry all that burden on His shoulders You have to give Him a hand You understand But, he would complain, how can a little boy even a big boy be any help to God Almighty, who is stronger than all the kings on the earth I ll show you how, Ilonka would say and then she d hug him To a man born blind, God is blind To a sick child, God is unfair To the condemned man in prison, God is also a prisoner On the other hand, to a free man, God is both the source of his freedom and its justification To be free is to be made in God s image Anyone who tries to place himself between the freedom of God and the freedom of man, between the word of man and the thought of God, is only being false to both man and God God alone may use the word I God alone understands its fearful power That s the sin of pride that comes from idolatry man putting his own I in the place of the Creator s We do better not to believe in luck Our Lord forbids it I m old enough to draw on my own experience Everything happens in thsi world because of encounters Meaning that since we are here, you and I, brought together by a force we do not understand, we must act as though everything happened in order to make our encounter take place It may be that we have lived our separate lives just for this moment, this meeting Rebbe Zusya would shout his answer, No, a thousand times no You have no right to give up on life when you feel its hopeless Each day is a blessing each moment gives you an opportunity for grace Haven t I taught you anything When men stopped believing in God, it was not because they believed in nothing but, rather, because they would believe in anything take off of G.K Chesterton quote The enemy s not the one we hate the most it s someone close to us It s the friend who lets us down, the brother who betrays us, the neighbor who turns us in A Jewish writer said that the silence of God is God I say that God is not silent, although He is the God of Silence He does call out It is by His silence that He calls to you Are you answering him The tragedy of Moses and Socrates, he would often say, was that while they had disciples adn lieutenants, they had no friends So began a singular encounter, one in which two lost souls thought they could rescue one another by calling on the love of those who were gone A word may change in meaning and scope according to its context The words kadesha, kedosha, and kedusha, in the Bible, are one example among many Those same words can mean whore, saint, and sanctity Sometimes we use the same words to glorify what is pure and to denounce what is not Todaythan ever, words transmit violence by describing it It is when he masters the word that Satan becomes all powerful Rebbe Zusya often spoke of Galut hadibur, the exile of the word When words lose their way, when they wander off and lose their meaning, when they become lies, he would say, those who speak or write them are the most uprooted of people And surely the most to be pitied Stop me if you ve heard this story before a Jewish widower whose estranged wife committed suicide and whose daughters have entirely rejected him works as a ghostwriter telling the stories of others while working on his own writings and seeking to come to terms with a terrible past that includes passing as the Christian nephew of a Hungarian cabaret dancer in World War II central Europe Admittedly, there are definitely some people who I can feel the character resembles in certain ways, but th Stop me if you ve heard this story before a Jewish widower whose estranged wife committed suicide and whose daughters have entirely rejected him works as a ghostwriter telling the stories of others while working on his own writings and seeking to come to terms with a terrible past that includes passing as the Christian nephew of a Hungarian cabaret dancer in World War II central Europe Admittedly, there are definitely some people who I can feel the character resembles in certain ways, but this novel is well within the current of fairly typical Elie Wiesel novels The plot is complex, the telling of the story even a bit convoluted, in a good way, and the character comes to terms with a difficult task through writing and thinking and feeling in a way that appears well earned, and something that the audience should at least be cheering on If this book is not particularly surprising if one has read any segment of the author s body of work, the book does reveal the author s penchant for writing well about what he knows, the experience of people whose lives were deeply scarred by the betrayals and traumas of the Holocaust experience and the rootlessness that resulted from being cast aside from one s hometowns and home villages and forced to try to find a new home abroad.In a way, it is greatly fitting that the author is a ghostwriter, because this book dwells the ghosts of memory that result from the past The author tries to understand the fierce letters of his estranged daughters, who wonder if the kindness and love he showed them before leaving France for the United States after the breakup of his marriage was only pretense, without being able to understand the sense of abandonment he felt when his parents left him with a kind but not particular moral cabaret singer who pleasured men while being repulsed by their slimy interest only in her sexuality A lot that goes on in this book is repellent, from the bestial hatred of the Jews and those kind to them shown by the Hungarians in the novel to the way that a desire to make someone happy can become twisted into an unhappiness that one cannot shake The protagonist writes and thinks and talks and seeks to come to terms with his past as he is faced with an amnesiac from Hungary who is dying from damage received in an accident, and comes to the understanding that one needs to start again and not merely go on after the losses he has suffered.The book also dwells thoughtfully and at considerable length on the problem of being a refugee The author notes, somewhat ironically, the unpopularity that refugees have in other countries, and the way in which statelessness is viewed as a disease and an affliction In the French characters hostility to people gaining a French nationality by virtue of marrying French citizens, one can see the struggles over identity and the place for refugees that is going on in American and European politics at present, where a sense of kindness towards some who have suffered wrongs in their homeland like Kurds, Assyrian Christians, or persecuted minorities around the world sits uneasily with a mistrust for those who seek to change the lands they move to and corrupt their host nations with demands for welfare and catering to their own traditions If the author is certainly sympathetic with the plight of the uprooted exile, he is also aware of the fact that in order for the exile to find happiness in life there must be a letting go of the past and the desire to start again in a new place One can only wish that the author found that sort of peace himself given his own wellspring of suffering as a child of the Shoah