READ PDF ⚣ They Called Us Enemy õ eBook or Kindle ePUB free

READ PDF ó They Called Us Enemy ã A graphic memoir recounting actor author activist George Takei s childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during World War II Experience the forces that shaped an American icon and America itselfLong before George Takei braved new frontiers in Star Trek, he woke up as a four year old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father s and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain futureIn , at the order of President Franklin D Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten relocation centers, hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard They Called Us Enemy is Takei s firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother s hard choices, his father s faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future George Takei, who was Sulu of Star Trek, relates his childhood of being imprisoned during World War II by the U.S government for around three years After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, approximately 120,000 of Japanese ancestry, who were living along the West coast regardless of U.S citizenship or that they had never been to Japan, were either arrested or incarcerated in relocation centers They were forced to abandon their homes, jobs, and possessions It was believed that they were loyal to t George Takei, who was Sulu of Star Trek, relates his childhood of being imprisoned during World War II by the U.S government for around three years After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, approximately 120,000 of Japanese ancestry, who were living along the West coast regardless of U.S citizenship or that they had never been to Japan, were either arrested or incarcerated in relocation centers They were forced to abandon their homes, jobs, and possessions It was believed that they were loyal to the Japanese emperor simply because of their ancestry and that they could not be assimilated Yet, the American Germans were never subjected to this same atrocity This illustrated memoir depicts his family s and the other detainees struggles and choices against this legalized racism It is a stark reminder that injustices, whether legalized or not, have and continue to occur because of discrimination This was phenomenal I ve been a big fan of graphic memoirs ever since reading Persepolis, and this book is the perfect example of why.We follow a four year old George Takei and his family as they are forced into concentration camps during WWII because of their Japanese ancestry Seeing this all through a young child s eyes was evenheart wrenching While his parents are just trying to get through the day and keep their family safe, young George and his brother Henry think they are going on This was phenomenal I ve been a big fan of graphic memoirs ever since reading Persepolis, and this book is the perfect example of why.We follow a four year old George Takei and his family as they are forced into concentration camps during WWII because of their Japanese ancestry Seeing this all through a young child s eyes was evenheart wrenching While his parents are just trying to get through the day and keep their family safe, young George and his brother Henry think they are going on a vacation or an adventure Through flash forwards from the 40s to present day, we see the repercussions this terrible experience has on George as he finds his voice while processing what his country put him through.We are also shown the repercussions this period has on American politics Our history books are notoriously white washed, never delving into the parts of our past that makes white Americans look like the bad guys For example, I was never taught about these American concentration camps in my public school history class, though we spent every year of middle and high school learning about those in Europe Takei touches on that throughout this graphic memoir He desperately tries to research his past, though no book makes any mention of it America has pushed this period of its history under a rug, thereby silencing all those who were there to witness it Only through stories from his father, was he able to process the atrocities they went through.As we never fully addressed this atrocity or hundredsthat we committed , we are thereby doomed to repeat them This is evident by the last couple of pages, which illustrate ICE detention centers along the U.S Mexico border and Trump s 2018 ban on immigration from Muslim countries.I thought this was an excellent graphic memoir that should be required reading in history classes I highly suggest you also check out George Takei s TED Talks on YouTube I couldn t reconcile what I read in these books about the shining ideas of our democracy with what I knew to be my childhood imprisonment What can I even say Everyone should read this book I am becoming a big fan of these graphic novel memoirs, and George Takei s look at his childhood imprisonment inside an American concentration camp might be the most powerful yet It succeeds wonderfully and horrifically on several levels It acts as a reminder of a shameful time in America s history a I couldn t reconcile what I read in these books about the shining ideas of our democracy with what I knew to be my childhood imprisonment What can I even say Everyone should read this book I am becoming a big fan of these graphic novel memoirs, and George Takei s look at his childhood imprisonment inside an American concentration camp might be the most powerful yet It succeeds wonderfully and horrifically on several levels It acts as a reminder of a shameful time in America s history a time so terrifyingly recent It offers far too many parallels with the present day, cautioning us against how very easy it is to turn a neighbour into an other into an enemy.It is also just a portrait of a childhood, and this might be what truly stuck the knife in my heart and made this read so absolutely devastating Takei recalls being a young boy and feeling, at first, like he and his family were going on an adventure Not understanding his parents fear and humiliation, but just trying to play games, run around, and be human in a country that was determined to see him as something else.It is tough to read, but absolutely necessary Also his parents were fucking heroes.Blog Facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube George Takei played a relatively minor character, Sulu, in the first iteration of Star Trek which ended far too soon Years later, many people got to watch this show in endless reruns, and he, with the rest of the cast, became famous to new generations Takei has become evenfamous as a social activist and humorist on social media, which opened up the possibility for him to use his fame to speak widely on behalf of a variety of social causes including gay rights , and develop a Broadway pe George Takei played a relatively minor character, Sulu, in the first iteration of Star Trek which ended far too soon Years later, many people got to watch this show in endless reruns, and he, with the rest of the cast, became famous to new generations Takei has become evenfamous as a social activist and humorist on social media, which opened up the possibility for him to use his fame to speak widely on behalf of a variety of social causes including gay rights , and develop a Broadway performance based on his life This book is basically another version of his life with a focus on his having grown up imprisoned in a Japanese internment camp for a few years from the time he was four years old.In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten relocation centers, and seen as enemies of the state Unlike now, where we separate refugee families into separate camps, the Japanese Americans in these camps were allowed to stay together, and Takei s drew closer as a family, but this unacceptable and shameful practice nevertheless became a scar in American history.I have been reviewing other books focused on the internment, but this was developed from Takei s life story by two writers and illustrated as a kind of graphic memoir, with teens and possibly younger students as intended audience It s an inspirational story, and should be read widely, again using his fame as a way to address a shameful period in American history, issues that are ongoing in American life, and in other countries as well The art is okay, the adapted story is okay, I d say 3 stars, but I bump it up to 4 stars for the timely topic and because I hope it will be used in schools and read by young people everywhere